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Formal Analysis of Comics

Page history last edited by Matt Brown 8 years, 8 months ago

This entry describes X as a critical approach to comics. Give a sentence or two describing the main features of approach X and the original or representative scholars behind it. 

 

<Not all entries will have all of the following sections, but these provide a good guide for structuring your entry.> <The structure of this template is inspired by the essays in Smith & Duncan, Critical Approaches to Comics.>

 

Background

 

For example, if one is talking about History, Philosophy, Communication, or some other field that is used not only in comics scholarship but also exists separate from / prior to that usage, describe the background on that field.

 

Underlying Assumptions

 

What assumptions are made by this field of analysis? How do those assumptions inform the kind of work that is done?

 

Types of Questions

 

What type of questions does this kind of analysis ask? What sorts of problems is it trying to solve? What is it trying to understand or reveal? List some examples.

 

Objects of Study

 

Does this type of analysis focus on the comic books themselves or something else? Is it applicable to only a certain type of comic book? Does it focus on only a specific part? What would be a paradigmatic example of such an object?

 

Methods of Analysis

 

What are the key methods employed by this form of criticism? How do they work? Give some quick examples. 

 

Bibliography

 

  • Give a chronological list of significant or representative work in this genre of comics criticism.

 

References 

 

  1. The sources used to compile this entry.

 

Further Reading

 

  • Links to other sources available online related to this entry.

 

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